FDBusiness.com

A Third of All British Drinkers Have Reduced or Limited Their Alcohol Intake

 Breaking News
  • Royal Unibrew Completes Acquisition of French Lemonade Business Royal Unibrew, the Denmark-based beverages group, has completed the acquisition of Etablissements Geyer Fréres for an enterprise value of DKr660 million (€88.5 million) financed by bank debt. The acquisition of Etablissements Geyer Fréres will give Royal Unibrew increased access to the French soft drinks market and will further strengthen its export portfolio. Employing about 100 [...]...
  • Private Label Outperforms FMCG Brands in Europe Private label continues to grow across Europe and is now outperforming brands in the majority of markets measured by big data and technology expert for consumer FMCG industries, IRI in its analysis of private label performance across eight major Western economies markets (UK, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Spain, Netherlands and the US) during 2017. Growing +4% year on [...]...
  • Meat & Poultry – Future-proof For Success The meat market remains fast-moving and competitive. As part of this processors and retailers are always looking for a point of differentiation. As well as new product development, this can mean new pack formats. Convenience remains a major driver here but this has to be matched by the ability to maintain product quality and freshness [...]...
  • Ready Meals – Not Ready For the Future New research (1) published by Eating Better, a powerful alliance of more than 50 organisations, shows that supermarkets need to shake up their ready meal ranges. They are not catering for the growing number of flexitarian customers who are cutting back on their meat eating for their health and the health of the planet (2). [...]...
  • Top 100 Largest Spirits Brands Revealed The world’s most popular alcoholic drink in 2017 was the South Korean soju brand Jinro, owned by Hite-Jinro, according to the IWSR Real 100, the definitive ranking of the world’s largest spirits brands by volume. Selling almost 76m nine-litre cases, Jinro retains its number one position from last year, and once again by a staggering [...]...

A Third of All British Drinkers Have Reduced or Limited Their Alcohol Intake

A Third of All British Drinkers Have Reduced or Limited Their Alcohol Intake
March 17
09:20 2017

While the majority of British adults enjoy a tipple, it seems today’s consumers are taking a more conservative approach towards their alcohol consumption. Indeed, new research from Mintel reveals that as many as one third (32%) of all Brits have reduced or limited their alcohol intake over the past 12 months* in comparison to what they would usually consume. What is more, half (51%) of the nation’s beer, wine and cider drinkers say they are drinking less alcohol than a few years ago, confirming Brits are actively moderating their drinking habits.

While many glasses may now be half empty, it is economical factors which are encouraging consumers to cut back. Over two in four (44%) Brits who have reduced their alcohol have done so in order to save money, while 41% of those choosing to limit alcohol intake have done so to lose or avoid gaining weight. Improving personal health (39%) is also a notable trigger for cutting down and a further 30% have cut-back to reduce the risk of disease. Additionally, some 14% of all those who have cut back on alcohol have done so because they are worried about becoming dependent on alcohol and the same proportion (14%) have cut back to stay within current NHS and government guidelines.

The consumers most likely to have cut back at some point are those aged 25-34 (35%) and 35-44 (36%); meanwhile, geographically this peaks at 41% in the North East and dips to 27% in the South East/East Anglia.

Today, one fifth (19%) of adults report they do not drink alcohol, with a slightly higher proportion of women (22%) than men (17%) being teetotal.

Richard Caines, Senior Food & Drink Analyst at Mintel, comments: “As many as a third of all Brits have limited or reduced their alcohol consumption at some point in the last year. While this includes consumers cutting back for shorter and longer periods of time, it is a strong indicator that steps to moderate alcohol consumption are now widespread. Reducing alcohol consumption to save money reflects the discretionary nature of drinks and how they can add significantly to outgoings.”

The fact that Brits are reducing the amount of alcohol they drink presents a significant opportunity for low-alcohol and alcohol-free beers, ciders and wines. Today, lower-alcohol beer, cider or wine is drunk by around one quarter (23%) of alcohol drinkers, while overall, just 14% of Brits drink non-alcoholic or alcohol-free beer, cider or wine. Usage of lower-alcohol drinks is higher among men (26%) and significantly above average for 18-34-year-olds (41%).

Pubs and bars are proving popular venues for low alcohol brands, as a night out (26%) and a casual drink at the pub (22%) are when low-alcohol drinks most appeal to consumers if they are limiting or reducing their alcohol intake.

A taste more like standard-strength equivalents would sway nearly three in 10 drinkers (28%) to consume low-alcohol or alcohol-free versions of alcoholic drinks. However, overall, soft drinks are more popular than low-alcohol, alcohol-free versions of alcoholic drinks for all occasions. For current alcohol drinkers, 41% say that if they were limiting the amount of alcohol they were drinking when having a casual drink at the pub then they’d pick a soft drink, compared to 29% who would pick a low-alcohol or non-alcoholic version of an alcoholic drink.

“Replicating the taste of standard-strength alcoholic drinks and changing perceptions remains a key challenge for low-alcohol and alcohol-free manufacturers. Alcohol-free versions of alcoholic drink brands also need to look at the reasons why consumers are limiting or reducing their alcohol intake in order to increase their appeal as an alternative to standard-strength alcoholic drinks. This includes offering bigger savings to those looking to save money, as well as prominently highlighting lower calorie content compared to standard-strength equivalents to those looking to better manage their weight and improve their health,” Richard Caines adds.

Finally, Mintel research reveals that weekly alcohol limits are a mystery for most Brits. Introduced in January, new guidelines on alcohol advise men and women to drink no more than 14 units of alcohol per week on a regular basis. However, when asked how many units of alcohol per week the current NHS and government guidelines advise for men and women, Mintel research indicates that only one in 10 (10%) adults correctly stated the 14 units a week recommended and more than four in 10 (42%) admitted that they didn’t know.

“While consumers are aware of the health dangers from drinking too much alcohol, few are clear on the limits advised in the new guidelines to keep health risks low. Low-alcohol drinks brands could benefit from driving awareness of these limits and what the number of units in individual drinks means in terms of their contribution to that weekly guidance. Doing so could help to encourage more switching over to low-alcohol products from higher-alcohol drinks,” Richard Caines concludes.

*12 months to November 2016

About Author

mike

mike

Related Articles



Food & Drink Business Conference & Exhibition 2016

Upcoming Events

  • September 5, 2018Int'l Food Products and Processing Technologies Exhibition (WorldFood Istanbul)
  • September 15, 2018iba
  • September 25, 2018PPMA Show 2018
  • September 27, 2018Int'l Fruit Show (eurofruit)
AEC v1.0.4

find food jobs

The Magazine

F&D Business Preferred Suppliers

New Subscriber





Subscribe Here



Advertisements