FDBusiness.com

England’s Poorest Areas are Fast Food Hotspots

 Breaking News
  • Another Year of Progress For Nestlé Nestlé has reported a 2.1% increase in sales to SFr91.4 billion (€80.6 billion) for 2018 with organic growth of 3% and group RIG of 2.5%, which was at the high end of the food and beverage industry, helped by faster innovation and successful new product launches. 2018 organic growth was supported by stronger momentum in [...]...
  • Fast-growing Asia Maternal Nutrition Market to Boost Demand For Dairy ingredients and Formula Maternal nutrition is a hot new opportunity in emerging markets, according to the latest report from food and drink experts, Zenith Global. In many parts of Asia, the concept of optimal nutrition during the first 1,000 days of a baby’s life (from conception to two years old) is capturing the attention of mothers and their [...]...
  • Innovation in the Spotlight at UK’s Largest Packaging Show Packaging Innovations, Empack and Label&Print 2019 returns to Birmingham’s NEC later this month with its most innovative show to date. The show, which also includes Contract Pack, Ecopack and Industrial Pack, will showcase more product launches and innovation from across the industry than ever before as it welcomes over 300 suppliers. As always, Innovation is the [...]...
  • £100 Million Müller Programme to Transform UK Fresh Milk Business Müller Milk & Ingredients, Britain’s largest producer of branded and private label fresh and flavoured milk, cream, butter and ingredients, has launched a £100 milliion cost and margin improvement programme which aims to secure a vibrant and sustainable future for the business, to the benefit of consumers, customers, employees and farmers. Project Darwin includes a comprehensive [...]...
  • Coca-Cola European Partners Continues to Focus on Driving Profitable Revenue Growth Coca-Cola European Partners has reported its fifth consecutive quarter of revenue growth and announced plans to trade on the London Stock Exchange. Revenue grew by 4.0% to €11.5 billion and comparable operating profit grew by 7.0% to €1.6 billion in 2018. Earnings per share were €2.30, an increase of 8.5%. Coca-Cola Zero Sugar led growth in [...]...

England’s Poorest Areas are Fast Food Hotspots

England’s Poorest Areas are Fast Food Hotspots
July 09
10:19 2018

New figures from Public Health England (PHE) reveal England’s poorest areas are fast food hotspots, with 5 times more outlets found in these communities than in the most affluent. The data also suggests fast food outlets – including chip shops, burger bars and pizza places –account for more than a quarter (26%) of all eateries in England.

The local environment has a major influence on our behaviours and streets crowded with fast food outlets can influence our food choices – many of these currently have no or little nutrition information in-store. Children exposed to these outlets, whether out with friends or on their way home from school, may find it more difficult to choose healthier options.

The new figures also show a variation in the number of fast food outlets across England, ranging from zero in some wards to over 100 in others.

Many local authorities across England have taken action to address their food environment and PHE is encouraging them to learn from each other. At least 40 areas have developed policies to restrict the growth of new takeaways and fast food outlets, and PHE has helped develop stronger planning guidance to support other areas in doing this.

Some have developed ‘healthier zones’ to help tackle childhood obesity by limiting the number of outlets in areas with high concentrations of fast food outlets, high levels of deprivation, or where children gather – including near schools, community centres, parks, playgrounds and other open spaces.

While not all fast food is unhealthy, it is typically higher in salt, calories and saturated fat, all of which can cause serious health problems when consumed too often and in large quantities. Children with excess weight are consuming up to 500 extra calories per day, so creating healthier environments could play an important role in tackling obesity and health inequalities.

Over a third of children in England are overweight or obese by the time they leave primary school – this figure is even higher in some deprived communities. This increases their risk of being overweight or obese adults and suffering preventable diseases including type 2 diabetes, heart disease and some cancers.

Dr Alison Tedstone, Chief Nutritionist at Public Health England, says: “It’s not surprising some children find it difficult to resist the lure of fast food outlets when many neighbourhoods are saturated with them. Local authorities have the power to help shape our environment and support people in making healthier choices. They need to question whether these fast food hotspots are compatible with their work to help families and young children live healthier lives.

“Food outlets can make a contribution to our high streets. However, with the impact of obesity on local authority social care budgets estimated at £352 million per year, encouraging healthier choices can make a positive difference.”

As part of its work to improve the local food environment, PHE supports local authorities’ work with small businesses to provide healthier options. This can be through using less salt, sugar and saturated fat in their products, as well as offering customers smaller portions and promoting healthier alternatives. Some areas have healthy catering schemes to recognise and support local retailers who are making such changes.

The Department of Health and Social Care recently announced the second chapter of its childhood obesity plan, including a trailblazer programme to help local authorities learn from each other. Another significant measure is a consultation on mandatory calorie labelling in the out of home sector, to help people make informed choices when eating out. These bold steps were announced as part of government’s ambition of halving childhood obesity by 2030.

PHE plays a significant role in achieving this ambition. It has challenged major players in the food industry to remove 20% of calories from popular foods – including chips, burgers, and pizzas – by 2024. This is in addition to its challenge to industry to reduce sugar in everyday products by 20% by 2020. With a quarter of our calories coming from food consumed outside the home, restaurants including fast food outlets and takeaways are expected to play their part.

As part of its One You campaign, PHE has also helped consumers find healthier options by partnering with major high street retailers, where millions of people buy their food every day.

About Author

mike

mike

Related Articles



Food & Drink Business Conference & Exhibition 2016

Upcoming Events

  • June 18, 2019Multimodal 2019
AEC v1.0.4

find food jobs

The Magazine

F&D Business Preferred Suppliers

New Subscriber

Subscribe Here



Advertisements