FDBusiness.com

Fraunhofer expert: nanoparticles don’t migrate from food plastics

 Breaking News
  • UK Supermarkets are Struggling to Grow The latest grocery market share figures, published by Kantar, show year-on-year supermarket sales were flat during the 12 weeks to 11 August 2019 as the tough comparisons with 2018’s strong summer continue. The memory of last year still looms large for retailers and this summer’s comparatively poor weather, combined with low levels of like-for-like price [...]...
  • Nestlé UK Launches New On-trend Flavours Nestlé has introduced two new on-trend flavours to its much-loved Munchies brand in the UK and Ireland. Available in 101g sharing bags, new Munchies Chocolate Fudge Brownie and Munchies Cookie Dough are the first new Munchies products since 1996. The new flavours were created at Nestlé’s confectionery sites in York and Fawdon, Newcastle. Munchies Brand Manager [...]...
  • Dedicated Industry Forums Take on Packaging’s Hottest Topics Experts from major brands, such as Coca-Cola, Ella’s Kitchen and REN Clean Skincare, will take to the stage as part of the dedicated industry forums for the beauty, food and drink sectors at Packaging Innovations and Luxury Packaging London 2019. The show, which returns to Olympia on 11 & 12 September, will tackle the key subjects [...]...
  • Greene King Being Sold For £2.7 Billion CK Asset, which is one of the largest property developers in Hong Kong and an international investment group, has made a recommended £2.7 billion cash offer for Greene King, the UK’s leading integrated brewer and pub retailer operating over 2,700 pubs, restaurants and hotels across England, Wales and Scotland. Including debt, the enterprise value of [...]...
  • The Hershey Company Takes Minority Stake in Irish Snacking Brand The Hershey Company, the US-based food group, has made a minority investment in Fulfil Holdings, the owner of the snacking brand FULFIL. Headquartered in Dublin, Ireland, FULFIL has rapidly grown since its inception, now outselling many traditional chocolate snack bar brands in the UK and Ireland and named a top 50 consumer brand in Ireland. Brian [...]...

Fraunhofer expert: nanoparticles don’t migrate from food plastics

April 26
11:52 2013

Nanoparticles from food and drink packaging will not migrate into the product, according to a prominent expert in the field.

Dr Roland Franz, coordinator of the Fraunhofer Institute’s department for process engineering and packaging, delivered his verdict at a lunch debate at the European Parliament on March 26.

Franz was addressing the question: can nanoparticles migrate from food contact plastics into foods? He used the European Commission’s recommendation of nanoparticles under 2011/696/EU.

His presentation was based on research conducted as part of the Bavarian Authority for Public Health and Food Safety project on Nanotechnology-related Food Safety.

He said migration studies showed no evidence that nanoparticles of silver and titanium nitride with spheric shape incorporated at various levels into low density polyethylene (LDPE) migrated into food simulants even under severe test conditions.

Highest mobility

Spherical nanoparticles were analysed because they are believed to have the highest mobility and LDPE was used because it is thought to allow for the highest mobility of migrants, he said.

Nanoparticles of titanium nitride are used in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles for water and soft drinks.

The European Food Safety Authority had also given its opinion that such an application involved no consumer exposure to nanoparticles, said Franz.

Franz added that particles measuring three to four nanometres in diameter “cannot migrate at all from LDPE and therefore from any plastics food contact material (FCM) following Fick‘ian law of diffusion”.

Aggregation and agglomeration

In any case, due to aggregation and agglomeration, nanoparticles of such a small size did not exist in FCM, he said.

Furthermore, even accounting for the worst case scenarios, he said the assumption was that nanoparticles were immobile once incorporated into FCM plastics.

“Concerns have been expressed whether release of nanoparticles from the food contact material surface due to mechanical material stress or due to aggressive interactions of the food with the FCM may be possible,” he continued.

“In this case the FCM would be technically not fit for purpose. This can be checked by electron microscopic imaging of the FCM surface or stress tests using an appropriate liquid contact medium.”

About Author

colin

colin

Related Articles

Food & Drink Business Conference & Exhibition 2016

Upcoming Events

  • September 11, 2019Packaging Innovations & Luxury Packaging London 2019
  • October 1, 2019PPMA Total Show
  • October 17, 2019Future Food-Tech
  • November 18, 2019Plastics Caps and Closures Conference 2019
AEC v1.0.4

Jobs: New Product Development

find food jobs

The Magazine

F&D Business Preferred Suppliers

New Subscriber

Subscribe Here



Advertisements