FDBusiness.com

Irish Heather Honey Buzzing With Health

 Breaking News
  • Lactalis Expands in Infant Nutrition With €740 Million Acquisition Lactalis Group, the international dairy group based in Laval, France, is acquiring the Nutritional business of Aspen Pharmacare for €739.8 million (R12.9 billion). The business being acquired supplies a wide range of infant nutritional and growing-up milk products across both the premium and value segments. It manufactures and markets well established quality brands, including S-26, [...]...
  • Thatchers Cider to Invest £14 Million in New Cider Mill Thatchers Cider, the family owned English cider producer, is to invest £14 million in a new cider mill at its Myrtle Farm site in Somerset to meet growing demand for its products. The company has applied for planning permission and, if granted, the new mill would come on stream in 2019. “This investment is about our [...]...
  • Coca-Cola Great Britain Teams Up With Premier League Premier League and Coca-Cola Great Britain have announced a new three-and-a-half-year partnership, starting in January 2019. It is the first sponsorship Coca-Cola Great Britain will activate across multiple brands within its portfolio, showcasing a range of drinks including sparkling soft drinks, water and fruit-based drinks, with low and no-sugar options. The partnership will see Coca-Cola work [...]...
  • Barry Callebaut Completes $30 Million Capacity Expansion in North America Barry Callebaut, the world’s leading manufacturer of high-quality chocolate and cocoa products, has announced the completion of several expansion investments in three of its North American facilities located in St Hyacinthe, Quebec; Chatham, Ontario; and St Albans, Vermont. The investments amount to close to US$30 million and are in line with previously announced plans. Recent investments [...]...
  • Strong First Half From Hilton Food Group Hilton Food Group, the UK-based leading specialist international food packing business, has reported a 25.0% increase in turnover to £863.6 million and by 24.5% on a constant currency basis for the 28 weeks to 15 July 2018. Volumes increased by 12.7% reflecting growth in the UK, Ireland and Australia. Operating profit for the first half [...]...

Irish Heather Honey Buzzing With Health

Irish Heather Honey Buzzing With Health
September 05
08:49 2018

A research team from Dublin City University and Trinity College Dublin has found that Irish heather honey is quite literally buzzing with health benefits. The findings showed that there was a similar overall presence of powerful antioxidants called phenolic compounds in Irish heather honey as in Manuka honey. These antioxidant compounds help to prevent damage occurring in the cells of the body and are important for health and well-being.

Researchers also found that multi-floral honeys produced by urban bees had a greater level of antioxidant phenolic compounds than their rural counterparts – a finding possibly attributed to the flower diversity and abundance surrounding hives.

The findings are published in the prestigious journal, Food Chemistry.

The research was led by PhD student Saorla Kavanagh (School of Chemical Sciences and DCU Water Institute) and supervised by senior academics Dr Blánaid White (School of Chemical Sciences, DCU) and Prof Jane Stout (School of Natural Sciences, Trinity College Dublin). Funding was provided by the Irish Research Council and honey samples were donated by beekeepers across Ireland.

The research focused on honey produced in Ireland and examined the phenolic content and physicochemical parameters (moisture, total sugar, colour) of different types of Irish honey and compared these with international brands.

It was also the first ever comparison of Irish single-origin honeys; heather, ivy and oilseed rape and multi-floral honeys and, in addition, compared honey from urban and rural hives.

Key Findings

  • 131 Irish honey samples were collected directly from beekeepers between 2013-2015 from 78 locations across Ireland. The majority (124) were multi-floral honeys (55 from urban, 69 from rural locations); three were heather honeys; two were ivy honeys and two were oilseed rape honeys.
  • Research focused on honey produced in Ireland and the majority of samples came from small private producers.
  • Honeys with a dark colour typically have a higher TPC (Total Phenolic Content) and thus a higher antioxidant capacity.
  • Urban multi-floral honeys had a higher TPC than rural multi-floral honeys.
  • Irish heather honey had the highest TPC of all Irish single origin honeys and had a higher TPC than Manuka honey.
  • Honey colour correlates with electrical conductivity and with TPC, although ivy honey was an exception to this.
  • Ivy honey was the darkest Irish honey analysed and its TPC was less than that of heather and Manuka honeys.
  • Honeys were classified according to landscape context or honey floral source.
  • The differences in the total phenolic content in the study could be linked to landscape context, specifically the principal land use surrounding sampled hives. There was significantly less TPC in rural vs urban areas.
  • Difference in the TPC of honey types depended on their floral origin. For Irish single origin honey, heather honey had the highest mean TPC.

Dr Blánaid White, Dublin City University, says: “Being able to quantify that Irish honeys have a high phenolic content, and particularly that the content in Irish heather honey is comparable to Manuka honey, is very exciting for us. Our research shows that Irish honey is a high-quality product and something that we should really value. Interest in beekeeping and honey production is growing in Ireland, and we are delighted to be able to support it.”

Prof Jane Stout, Trinity College, Dublin says: “Because bees can forage up to several kilometres from their hives, the availability of food sources, i.e. flowers, in the wider landscape influences what the bees collect and incorporate into their honey. Finding a difference in honey composition between urban and rural hives probably reflects the difference in flower availability in urban and rural areas in Ireland.”

The research carried out aligns with the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine’s strategic vision detailed in Food Wise 2025, highlighting the high-quality honeys produced in Ireland and helping to ensure the viability of local beekeepers and honey producers.

Honey is one of the most popular food products internationally, providing many benefits for overall health with its antioxidant, antibacterial, antidiabetic and anti-inflammatory properties.

CAPTION:

PhD student Saorla Kavanagh, DCU School of Chemical Sciences and DCU Water Institute, who led the research that has found Irish heather honey as having health benefits comparable with Manuka honey.

About Author

mike

mike

Related Articles



Food & Drink Business Conference & Exhibition 2016

Upcoming Events

  • September 25, 2018PPMA Show 2018
  • September 27, 2018Int'l Fruit Show (eurofruit)
  • September 30, 2018Trade Fair for Butchers, Caterers and Meat Industry (Meat Expo)
  • October 1, 2018Poznan International Fair
AEC v1.0.4

find food jobs

The Magazine

F&D Business Preferred Suppliers

New Subscriber





Subscribe Here



Advertisements