FDBusiness.com

Modifying microbial fermentation conditions can improve probiotic survival

 Breaking News
  • Coca-Cola European Partners to Remove 4,000 Tonnes of Single-use Plastic by Swapping Shrink Wrap For Cardboard in Western Europe Coca-Cola European Partners, will be replacing plastic shrink wrap with cardboard for its can multipacks across Western Europe, removing approximately 4,000 tonnes of single-use plastic per year across the region. This is the latest move in Coca-Cola’s commitment to tackle packaging waste and remove all unnecessary single-use plastic from its secondary packaging. Plastic shrink wrapping is used [...]...
  • EU Leading in Global Agri-food Trade The EU has been confirmed for yet another year in its position as the largest global exporter of agri-food products, with sales reaching €138 billion in 2018. Agriculture products represent a solid share of 7% of the value of EU total goods exported in 2018, ranking fourth after machinery, other manufactured goods and chemicals. Agriculture and [...]...
  • Is ‘Flexitarianism’ the Future? A workshop held recently at the University of Nottingham has revealed that ‘flexitarianism’ is a new and growing trend amongst British consumers. Delegates at an event that discussed plant-based diets heard how eating more plant-based products represented a sustainable future for food and drink production. Organised by the Agrifood Training Partnership (AFTP), and chaired by AFTP [...]...
  • Chivas Brothers Opens New Head Office Chivas Brothers, the Scotch whisky business of Pernod Ricard, has opened a new 27,000 sq ft head office in the centre of Glasgow. Jean-Christophe Coutures, chairman and chief executive of Chivas Brothers, says: “We need to keep moving with the times and this is the beginning of a new and exciting chapter for Chivas Brothers [...]...
  • Unilever Achieves 100% Renewable Electricity Across Five Continents Unilever has announced that its factories, offices, R&D facilities, data centres, warehouses and distribution centres across five continents are now powered by 100% renewable grid electricity. As far as possible, Unilever’s transition to renewable electricity has been delivered through supporting the development of local renewable energy markets, with 38% of its grid electricity supplied through [...]...

Modifying microbial fermentation conditions can improve probiotic survival

June 30
11:25 2013

Small variations in the growth conditions of probiotics may have a major effect on their survival and robustness, according to new research.

New techniques that identify and modify the fermentation conditions and genes that are involved in human gastrointestinal tract persistence may help to improve the survival of probiotics – so helping industry to select and develop probiotic strains and starter cultures with improved robustness end effectiveness, finds the new research carried out as part of the TI Food and Nutrition network.

Carried out by Hermien van Bokhorst-van de Veen of Wageningen University, and in conjunction with NIZO Food Research, the research looked for ways to identify and manipulate stress responses of probiotic bacteria that may modify digestive tract robustness and survival.

Speaking with NutraIngredients, van Bokhorst-van de Veen said her work has found that that small variations in growth conditions of bacteria such as Lactobacillus plantarum have a large effect on survival and the expression levels of certain genes.

The Dutch researcher created a new in vitro assay that mimics the action of the digestive tract in order to test the survival and robustness of probiotic strains in a quick and inexpensive way. She then used this assay to test how different strains reponses to stress during their fermentation affected survival in the digestive tract.

“The results showed a large variation in survival based on how the stress responses the strain had been put through,” explained van Bokhorst-van de Veen.

She added that in view of the wide use of these bacteria in the food industry, the new findings will help industry to select and develop products with probiotics that are more robust to survival within the gut.

Further work carried out in humans by van Bokhorst-van de Veen and her colleagues followed the survival of 10 strains through the digestive tract finding that when one streain survived well, it did so in all people  – something that van Bokhorst-van de Veen said is ‘quite remarkable’ given the differences between people and their microbiota make up.

“The findings in humans were also linked to the findings from the in vitro assay,” she said. “There was significant correlation between the in vitro results and the lab tests on people.”

“Since the persistence measured in the human volunteers could be correlated with the survival found in the in vitro model, we can use this fast and inexpensive model to predict actual gastrointestinal tract survival.

“In addition, combining strains reduces the amount of work and time needed for industry to test promising strains for food applications.”

Using the toolkit of assays and methods to ‘shock’ cultures in fermentation, the Dutch researcher suggests that industry can test and increase a number of traits in friendly bacteria.

“Industry could use the assay to test many different traits, and not just survival in the digestive tract,” she added.

About Author

colin

colin

Related Articles

Food & Drink Business Conference & Exhibition 2016

Upcoming Events

  • October 1, 2019PPMA Total Show
  • October 17, 2019Future Food-Tech
  • November 18, 2019Plastics Caps and Closures Conference 2019
AEC v1.0.4

find food jobs

The Magazine

F&D Business Preferred Suppliers

New Subscriber

Subscribe Here



Advertisements