FDBusiness.com

New Research Shows Soil Microorganisms Can Help Farming Contribute to Cutting Harmful Greenhouse Gases

 Breaking News
  • Royal Unibrew Completes Acquisition of French Lemonade Business Royal Unibrew, the Denmark-based beverages group, has completed the acquisition of Etablissements Geyer Fréres for an enterprise value of DKr660 million (€88.5 million) financed by bank debt. The acquisition of Etablissements Geyer Fréres will give Royal Unibrew increased access to the French soft drinks market and will further strengthen its export portfolio. Employing about 100 [...]...
  • Private Label Outperforms FMCG Brands in Europe Private label continues to grow across Europe and is now outperforming brands in the majority of markets measured by big data and technology expert for consumer FMCG industries, IRI in its analysis of private label performance across eight major Western economies markets (UK, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Spain, Netherlands and the US) during 2017. Growing +4% year on [...]...
  • Meat & Poultry – Future-proof For Success The meat market remains fast-moving and competitive. As part of this processors and retailers are always looking for a point of differentiation. As well as new product development, this can mean new pack formats. Convenience remains a major driver here but this has to be matched by the ability to maintain product quality and freshness [...]...
  • Ready Meals – Not Ready For the Future New research (1) published by Eating Better, a powerful alliance of more than 50 organisations, shows that supermarkets need to shake up their ready meal ranges. They are not catering for the growing number of flexitarian customers who are cutting back on their meat eating for their health and the health of the planet (2). [...]...
  • Top 100 Largest Spirits Brands Revealed The world’s most popular alcoholic drink in 2017 was the South Korean soju brand Jinro, owned by Hite-Jinro, according to the IWSR Real 100, the definitive ranking of the world’s largest spirits brands by volume. Selling almost 76m nine-litre cases, Jinro retains its number one position from last year, and once again by a staggering [...]...

New Research Shows Soil Microorganisms Can Help Farming Contribute to Cutting Harmful Greenhouse Gases

New Research Shows Soil Microorganisms Can Help Farming Contribute to Cutting Harmful Greenhouse Gases
July 18
10:12 2014

Newly published research into soil microbes shows how, eventually, farmers might reduce greenhouse gas production through the way they manage their soils. The work, by an EU wide consortium including Teagasc and researchers from Scotland’s Rural College (SRUC), shows how effectively a newly discovered group of soil microbes breaks down Nitrous Oxide, a major contributor to global warming and a gas blamed for depleting the ozone layer. It suggests that if their growth could be encouraged soils could make a greater contribution to addressing climate change.

The research, published in the respected journal Nature Climate Change, was led by the INRA agroecolgy centre in France. The consortium involved scientists from Teagasc, the Irish Agriculture and Food Development Authority, the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences and from Scotland, the James Hutton Institute and SRUC.

“Compared with what we know about Carbon Dioxide and Methane we don’t understand enough how different soil microorganisms create Nitrous Oxide or break it down,” says SRUC Soil Ecologist, Professor Bryan Griffiths.

“This work gives us greater knowledge about the bugs which reduce harmful Nitrous Oxide to useful Nitrogen and Oxygen. We have also discovered that the effect of this denitrification does not depend on one simple soil factor like drainage or pH but relies on the abundance of these microbes. The next step will be to look at the factors that control their abundance and activity.”

There are literally billions of different microorganisms in soils. Instead of looking for particular individual species the researchers used DNA analysis to look for the genes linked to denitrification. Their results, from a survey of 47 different soils across Europe, represent many species of microorganism all of which share this ability to reduce Nitrous Oxide.

According to Bryan Griffiths: “Nitrous Oxide contributes some 6% to global warming and has a major affect on the ozone layer. Around 70% of the world’s Nitrous Oxide comes from various land-based ecosystems and 60% of that can be attributed to microbial processes in agriculture. If we can find ways of altering the balance so that there are larger populations of these Nitrous Oxide reducing microbes, it will help agriculture reduce what we call its environmental footprint.”

For a full version of the Research paper ‘Recently identified microbial guild mediates soil N2O sink capacity’ use this link http://www.nature.com/nclimate/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nclimate2301.html

About Author

mike

mike

Related Articles



Food & Drink Business Conference & Exhibition 2016

Upcoming Events

  • September 5, 2018Int'l Food Products and Processing Technologies Exhibition (WorldFood Istanbul)
  • September 15, 2018iba
  • September 25, 2018PPMA Show 2018
  • September 27, 2018Int'l Fruit Show (eurofruit)
AEC v1.0.4

find food jobs

The Magazine

F&D Business Preferred Suppliers

New Subscriber





Subscribe Here



Advertisements