FDBusiness.com

Report: Little to Fear from Nanoparticles in Food & Packaging

 Breaking News
  • Müller Completes Largest Single Investment in Scottish Dairy Processing in a Decade Müller Milk & Ingredients has completed a £15 million project to substantially upgrade Scotland’s largest fresh milk dairy in Bellshill and secure 265 jobs. The project represents the largest single investment in Scottish dairy processing for more than a decade. It gives Müller’s Bellshill dairy the capacity to process more than 370 million litres of fresh [...]...
  • Changing Consumer Habits to Shape EU Agricultural Markets by 2030 The European Commission has published projections for the European agricultural markets to 2030 for a wide range of agri-food products, including meat, arable crops, milk and dairy products, and fruit and vegetables. The evolution of agricultural income and the environmental aspects of EU agriculture are also covered, as well as a special focus on the [...]...
  • Irish Grass-fed Beef – Opportunities For Healthier Diets Ireland’s climate means that the country is good at growing grass. It is well known that producing beef from grass results in lower costs than feeding animals on concentrates. But what about the consumer? Is grass-fed beef better than other types of beef for consumers? This was the focus of a Department of Agriculture, Food and [...]...
  • Change of Leadership at Edrington Edrington, the international premium spirits company, has announced that chief executive officer Ian Curle will retire in March 2019 after 15 years in that role. His successor will be Scott McCroskie, who is currently a member of the Edrington board and managing director of The Macallan. Ian Curle joined the business in 1986 through Edrington’s subsidiary [...]...
  • Guinness to Sponsor Six Nations Rugby The iconic global brand Guinness is to become the new title sponsor of the Six Nations, with the Championship to be known as the Guinness Six Nations from 2019. The Six Nations is one of the world’s best attended sports events and regularly attracts record TV and online audiences in the UK, France, Ireland, Italy [...]...

Report: Little to Fear from Nanoparticles in Food & Packaging

June 20
12:53 2016

mangoes-1466878059Food Standards Australia and New Zealand has just released two long-awaited reports on thesafety of nanoparticles in food, one on additives and one on packaging. Both reports were based on comprehensive surveys of the scientific literature and relevant patents.

The reports were commissioned in 2015 and were written by one of Australia’s leading toxicologists, Dr Roger Drew, and his colleague Tarah Hagen.

The conclusions of both reports is that the most common nanoscale materials likely to be present in food or food packaging – silicon dioxide, titanium dioxide and metallic silver – do not pose significant health risks.

In terms of food, many common foods already contain natural nanoparticles, but FSNAZ was specifically interested in “engineered” or manufactured nanoparticles and their effects. Wheras the packaging studies – where nanomaterials are used in packaging – have shown that nanomaterials can migrate from the packaging into the food inside.

Ingested nanoparticles can, and do, get into the body in places where bulk materials cannot, but there is no evidence that mere size is responsible for the effects observed in laboratory studies. Any impact is caused by soluble materials or colloids, such as gels, that are formed by interaction of the nanomaterials with aggressive components, such as food acids or body fluids.

However, it was noted that there have been few studies of the effects of nanoparticles on large populations of people. That said, nanomaterials have been used for many years, and there has been no evidence of harm.

While there is no sign that nanomaterials are used in food packaging in Australia or New Zealand, they are being used overseas. Some applications are adding nanoparticles of clay to make packaging more robust, or adding nanosilver as a disinfectant. Some future developments could involve nanoparticles that act as indicators, by changing colour for instance, if the contents deteriorate in quality over time.

These reports should reassure us that the scientific and empirical evidence to date suggests nanoparticles in food or food packaging pose low risk.

About Author

admin

admin

Related Articles



Food & Drink Business Conference & Exhibition 2016

Upcoming Events

  • June 18, 2019Multimodal 2019
AEC v1.0.4

Jobs: Food Packaging

find food jobs

The Magazine

F&D Business Preferred Suppliers

New Subscriber





Subscribe Here



Advertisements