FDBusiness.com

Study: High fibre diet can reduce cancer risk

 Breaking News
  • Sweets and Snacks New Product Development Thrives on Adventure and Bite-size Trends With one in four global consumers increasing their consumption of confectionery over the past year (Innova Market Insights Consumer Survey, 2018) because “there is more variety & novelty available,” the food industry is responding. New data from Innova Market Insights finds a 15 percent average annual growth in global confectionery launches with a “discovery” claim [...]...
  • 80,000 Tonnes of Skimmed Milk Powder Sold in Biggest Tender A total of 80,424.05 tonnes of the skimmed milk powder bought into public stock by the European Commission since 2015 were sold in the latest tender sale, bringing the remaining stock to around 22,000 tonnes out of the original 380,000 tonnes, stockpiled since the crisis that hit the dairy sector in 2015. In effect, almost [...]...
  • Müller Rolls Out ‘Stealth’ Milk Caps Müller, Britain’s leading producer of branded and private label fresh milk, cream, butter and ingredients, is rolling out a new lightweight recyclable milk cap, which uses 13% less plastic material. The innovative solution allows the business to remove 300 tonnes of plastic every year, the equivalent weight of 231 million ‘stealth’ milk caps. The dairy company has [...]...
  • Greene King Announces New Chief Executive The board of Greene King has announced that Nick Mackenzie will join the board on 1st May 2019 as chief executive in succession to Rooney Anand. Nick Mackenzie will be joining from Merlin Entertainments where, as a member of the executive committee, he is responsible for the Midway portfolio of attractions, which comprises over 100 [...]...
  • Irish Grocery Market Hits Festive Record as Retailers Cash in on Christmas The Irish grocery market grew by an impressive 3.0% over the 12 weeks to 30 December, ensuring a record festive period for retailers. The latest Kantar Worldpanel data shows value sales reached €995 million in the month of December – the highest monthly total ever recorded in the Irish grocery market. This was driven by [...]...

Study: High fibre diet can reduce cancer risk

February 09
10:45 2016

ECFruitWomen who eat more high-fibre foods during adolescence and young adulthood – especially lots of fruits and vegetables – may have significantly lower breast cancer risk than those who eat less dietary fibre when young, according to a new large-scale study led by researchers at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

The study was published online February 1, 2016 in Pediatrics.

“Previous studies of fibre intake and breast cancer have almost all been non-significant, and none of them examined diet during adolescence or early adulthood, a period when breast cancer risk factors appear to be particularly important,” said Maryam Farvid, visiting scientist at Harvard Chan School and lead author of the study. “This work on the role of nutrition in early life and breast cancer incidence suggests one of the very few potentially modifiable risk factors for premenopausal breast cancer.”

The researchers looked at a group of 90,534 women who participated in the Nurses’ Health Study II, a large long-running investigation of factors that influence women’s health. In 1991, the women–ages 27-44 at the time–filled out questionnaires about their food intake, and did so every four years after that. They also completed a questionnaire in 1998 about their diet during high school. The researchers analyzed the women’s fibre intake while adjusting for a number of other factors, such as race, family history of breast cancer, body mass index, weight change over time, menstruation history, alcohol use, and other dietary factors.

Breast cancer risk was 12%-19% lower among women who ate more dietary fibre in early adulthood, depending on how much more they ate. High intake of fibre during adolescence was also associated with 16% lower risk of overall breast cancer and 24% lower risk of breast cancer before menopause. Among all the women, there was a strong inverse association between fibre intake and breast cancer incidence. For each additional 10 grams of fibre intake daily–for example, about one apple and two slices of whole wheat bread, or about half a cup each of cooked kidney beans and cooked cauliflower or squash–during early adulthood, breast cancer risk dropped by 13%. The greatest apparent benefit came from fruit and vegetable fibre.

The authors speculated that eating more fibre-rich foods may lessen breast cancer risk partly by helping to reduce high oestrogen levels in the blood, which are strongly linked with breast cancer development.

“From many other studies we know that breast tissue is particularly influenced by carcinogens and anti-carcinogens during childhood and adolescence,” said Walter Willett, Fredrick John Stare Professor of Epidemiology and Nutrition at Harvard Chan School and senior author of the study. “We now have evidence that what we feed our children during this period of life is also an important factor in future cancer risk.”

About Author

admin

admin

Related Articles



Food & Drink Business Conference & Exhibition 2016

Upcoming Events

  • June 18, 2019Multimodal 2019
AEC v1.0.4

find food jobs

The Magazine

F&D Business Preferred Suppliers

New Subscriber

Subscribe Here



Advertisements