FDBusiness.com

Sugar Reduction and Clean Labeling Significant But Not Predominant in Sugar Confectionery Choices

 Breaking News
  • Raisio to Invest €45 Million in New Healthy Foods Facility Finnish and international food company Raisio is investing €45 million in a production facility developing and manufacturing plant-based added value products. The investment is in response to the strong growth in demand for plant-based food, particularly in the European markets. The project is funded by the company’s strong cash position and cash flow. The investment [...]...
  • Bord Bia Opens Third Office in Asia Bord Bia (Irish Food Board) has opened a new office in Tokyo, Japan, bringing to 14 the number of international offices it has promoting the Irish food and drinks industry overseas. Through its Prioritising Markets – Opportunities for Growth study, Bord Bia has identified Japan as being in the top five priority markets for Irish [...]...
  • Packaging Innovations London Set to Inspire at 10th Anniversary Show Packaging Innovations 2019 will return to Olympia for its 10th edition on 11 & 12 September, hosted alongside Luxury Packaging London. As the capital’s most exclusive packaging event it will bring the industry together in a festival of cutting-edge, branded and bespoke packaging, when it welcomes over 180 industry specialists to what is set to be [...]...
  • Fazer to Sell Food Service Business to Compass Group For €475 Million In line with its strategy of focusing on its fast-moving consumer goods and direct-to-consumer businesses, Fazer Group, the international family-owned food business, has agreed to sell Fazer Food Services, a food service provider in the Nordic region, to Compass Group for €475 million, subject to EU Commission competition approval. Fazer Food Services has a total [...]...
  • Müller Targets 25% Sugar Reduction The UK’s favourite yogurt brand[1], which includes Müller Corner and Müllerlight, has confirmed that it is targeting a total sugar reduction of 25%[2] across its branded yogurt portfolio by June 2020 which would equate with the removal of 3300 tonnes of sugar since 2015. If achieved, the reduction would be substantially ahead of Public Health England’s voluntary guidelines which seek [...]...

Sugar Reduction and Clean Labeling Significant But Not Predominant in Sugar Confectionery Choices

Sugar Reduction and Clean Labeling Significant But Not Predominant in Sugar Confectionery Choices
November 05
09:30 2018

Across the ten highest consuming nations for both sugar confectionery and gum, consumption is increasing, with CAGRs ranging from 0.5 percent to 3.0 percent over the 2010-2022 forecasted period. Global sales were worth US$85.8 billion in 2017 and expected to reach around US$100 billion by 2022 (Innova Market Insights, 2018).

“While concerns about the unhealthiness of sugar confectionery are apparent when consumers are questioned,” reports Lu Ann Williams, Director of Innovation at Innova Market Insights. “This does not necessarily relate to their actual purchasing or consumption habits.”

The three leading drivers of choice are flavour, cost, and indulgence. Indulgence is the key factor that Italian, French and Russian consumers pay importance to when buying sugar confectionery. In other countries, flavour and cost are more important considerations.

But beyond these three factors when buying sugar confectionery, certain health aspects may have an influence on the choice of one product over another.

While sugar-free gum has been around for many years, sugar-free confectionery as a whole has yet to become such an established sector. According to Innova Market Insights data, just six percent of sugar confectionery launches in the 12 months to the end of June 2018, used a sugar-free positioning, compared with over two-thirds of gum introductions.

Across the 19 countries surveyed by Innova Market Insights, an average 24 percent of respondents claimed to be influenced by a sugar confectionery product’s sugar content and a similar amount by whether the product is natural or not. This means that around threequarters of respondents across the 19 countries were not influenced by sugar content, therefore there are still a minority of people who look for these products.

With a greater focus on sugar intake, however, companies are making concerted efforts to reduce sugar in their products; indeed sugar reduction is perhaps a bigger trend than sugar-free as it offers more scope for manufacturers and is less impactful on the taste of the finished product.

“Given the growing momentum behind reducing sugar intake, some may argue that sugar confectionery and to a lesser extent gum is on shaky ground,” notes Lu Ann Williams. “However, these products are enjoyed the world over and there are plenty of ways in which companies can head off any future downturn in consumption and sales,” she adds.

Key will be the creation of interest and excitement in the category and giving consumers a reason to purchase their products over other snack foods perhaps perceived to be healthier. “The use of flavour will continue to be important to achieve this, but there is also a need to switch to natural flavours following the move to natural colours,” she explains. “Companies can also look to use more indulgent premium flavors, targeting the adult market with more value added premium-style offerings.”

About Author

mike

mike

Related Articles



Food & Drink Business Conference & Exhibition 2016

Upcoming Events

  • June 18, 2019Multimodal 2019
  • June 25, 2019BevExpo 2019
  • October 17, 2019Future Food-Tech
AEC v1.0.4

find food jobs

The Magazine

F&D Business Preferred Suppliers

New Subscriber

Subscribe Here



Advertisements