FDBusiness.com

Sustainably Farmed Seafood Holds Key to Future Global Food Security

 Breaking News
  • Florette Further Expands its UK Business In line with its strategy to be a major player within the UK fresh produce category, Florette UK & Ireland (part of the French Agrial group) has acquired the Wigan site of MyFresh Prepared Produce, a producer of a wide range of salad and vegetable products. MyFresh, Wigan, which employs almost 300 people and was [...]...
  • FrieslandCampina Simplifies its Organisation Royal FrieslandCampina intends to simplify its organizational structure into four to be set up global business groups – Consumer Dairy, Specialised Nutrition, Ingredients and Basic Dairy. A less complex structure will enable FrieslandCampina to more decisively respond to the market developments and to innovate better with respect to strategic priorities. The objective of the new [...]...
  • Heineken’s Acquisition of Punch is Cleared The Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) has accepted proposals by Heineken to resolve concerns over its £402.7 million acquisition of Punch Taverns, one of the UK’s largest leased pub companies, with a portfolio of more than 3,500 pubs nationwide. In June, the CMA said that Heineken’s proposed purchase of part of the Punch Taverns estate [...]...
  • Changing Consumer Tastes Drive Long-term Global Sugar Market Slowdown The consumers’ shift away from sugar consumption is an important driver behind significant changes in the food and beverage industry. These changes will have long-term ramifications, including a likely slowdown in the worldwide sugar market, according to the latest report of Rabobank ‘Sweetness and Lite’. A combination of changing preferences, product reformulations and government pressure have [...]...
  • How is the Rise of E-Commerce Changing the Role of Physical Stores? The rise of the internet has allowed retailers to directly connect with consumers from beyond the physical store revolutionising the competitive space more than ever. The world recently saw the acquisition of Amazon and Whole Foods which sent shock waves through the retail industry. This unforeseen merger has put retailers under pressure more than ever [...]...
  • SPX FLOW Appoints Pierre Sbabo as Vice President, Food and Beverage in EMEA SPX FLOW has announced the appointment of Pierre Sbabo as the Vice President of its Food and Beverage business in EMEA. He comes from a strong background in the water and process technology markets with truly international experience. With a Master’s Degree in Marketing and International Business from ESC Chambery, Sbabo has worked for global leaders [...]...

Sustainably Farmed Seafood Holds Key to Future Global Food Security

Sustainably Farmed Seafood Holds Key to Future Global Food Security
June 20
11:49 2011

The first-ever global assessment of the environmental costs of aquaculture shows that farmed seafood is less ecologically damaging than livestock production, and that there is great potential for improvements in efficiency.

A new and comprehensive analysis released by WorldFish Center and Conservation International (CI) has investigated the environmental impact of the world’s major aquaculture production systems and species, and offers a first-ever global assessment of trends and impacts of cultivated seafood. The analysis has found that, from the 75 species-production systems reviewed, more production means more ecological impact, but that compared to other forms of animal protein production such as livestock, aquaculture is more efficient.

The report, ‘Blue Frontiers: Managing the environmental costs of aquaculture’, along with a companion policy recommendations paper, concludes that the demand for aquaculture products will continue to grow over the next two decades as a key source of animal protein for growing urban populations, and that the industry needs to meet this demand with improved efficiencies and reduced environmental impacts.

Among the landmark report’s major findings are two key highlights: (1) the environmental impact of aquaculture varies dramatically by country, region, production system and species , and (2) a review of published information found that aquaculture is more efficient and less damaging to the environment, compared to other animal protein production systems such as beef and pork, and is likely to be among the most important sources of protein for human health and nutrition in growing urban populations in many parts of the developing world. The report also highlights that there is great room for improvement, by identifying and sharing best practices, increasing investment in innovation, and strengthening policies and regulations.

$100+ Billion Industry

Driving the scientists’ research was the recognition of aquaculture as one of the fastest growing food production sectors in the world. It has grown at an average annual rate of 8.4% since 1970 and total production reached 65.8 million tonnes in 2008 according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). Today, aquaculture is a $100+ billion industry that now provides more than half of all seafood consumed in the world, surpassing wild-caught seafood.

Using all available data from 2008, the study compared aquaculture’s global demands across a wide variety of species groups (13), geographies (18 countries), feed types (5) and numerous production systems in use today, allowing scientists to compare and contrast 75 different types of species-production systems, to determine their environmental impacts on acidification, climate change, energy demand, land-use demand, and other ecological factors.

Findings

Following almost two years of data gathering and analysis, researchers found that:

* China and the rest of Asia collectively supply an overwhelming majority of the world’s cultivated seafood, at 91% of global supply. China alone accounts for 64% of global production.

* On the other end of the supply chain, Europe produces 4.4%, South America produces 2.7%, South American produces 1.9%, and Africa produces 1.6%.

* Most popular aquaculture by country: carp tops the list for China and the rest of Asia; salmon is number one for Europe and Latin America, finfish (tilapias) rank highest in African aquaculture.

* Aquaculture with the highest environmental impact include: eel, salmon, and shrimps & prawns, due to significant energy and fish feeds required for production – these represent greatest opportunities for improvement.

* Aquaculture with the lowest/least environmental impact include: bivalves (mussels and oysters), mollusks, seaweed (those toward the bottom of the food chain; don’t require additional feed).

* Efficiency of salmon production methods: while salmon production trends toward the high end of the environmental impact scale due to the use of wildfish for feed, production methods in northern Europe, Canada and Chile were found to be more efficient than those in China and other Asian countries (in terms of acidification, climate change, energy demand and land occupation).

* Efficiency of shrimp and prawn production methods: cultivation in China was found to be much less efficient than other producer countries (e.g. Thailand) in terms of acidification, climate change and energy demand.

* Aquaculture vs wild-caught fisheries: aquaculture today accounts for a significant majority of all consumed seaweeds (99%), carps (90%), and salmon (73%), and also delivers half (50%) of the total global supply of tilapia, catfish, mollusks, crabs and lobsters.

Looking toward the future of seafood cultivation, ‘Blue Frontiers’ projects that global aquaculture production will continue to grow at current rates, with conservative estimates of 65-85 million tones produced in 2020, and 79-110 million tones by 2030. By comparison, 69 million tonnes of cultivated seafood were produced in 2008.

“China, India and the rest of Asia with their growing middle classes are where we can expect demand for fish to rise most significantly,” says co-author Mike Phillips, a senior scientist at WorldFish. “Current trends indicate that the majority of the increase in global production will come from South and Southeast Asia, with a continued drive by major producer counties such as China and Vietnam towards export to European and North American markets.”

About Author

colin

colin

Related Articles



Food & Drink Business Conference & Exhibition 2016

Upcoming Events

  • September 11, 2017drinktec
  • September 13, 2017FI Asia
  • September 19, 2017PROCESS EXPO 2017
  • September 22, 2017Global Summit on Food & Beverages
AEC v1.0.4

The Magazine

F&D Business Preferred Suppliers

Advertisements