FDBusiness.com

UK firm defends traditional freezing equipment

 Breaking News
  • Brexit Deal Vital to Protecting Irish All-island Supply Chains Food Drink Ireland (FDI), the Ibec group that represents the food industry, has said the full implementation of the December Brexit deal was vital to protect complex all-island supply chains. The deal now needs to be put into a binding legal contract, there can be no black-sliding on clearly agreed commitments. At the launch of [...]...
  • GEA Cooling Systems For Pork Production in Russia At the end of last year, the pig slaughter and processing entity Agroeco-Yug signed a contract with the technology group GEA for the supply, installation and commissioning of an extensive cooling system. This plant will be built in the Voronezh region and will be one of Russia’s largest businesses for the slaughter and processing of [...]...
  • Modulfill Bloc FS-C Filler-seamer Block – Krones’ First Block Solution For Cans Premiered This is definitely something new – for the first time, beverage producers can buy, from Krones, an all-in-one solution for filling and seaming cans. This block is packed full of Krones’ knowledge coupled with state-of-the-art technology. Modulfill VFS-C Filler The Modulfill VFS-C is a volumetric can filler, suitable for both small and large output ranges. Depending on [...]...
  • The Best and Worst UK Supermarkets Aldi is the UK’s favourite supermarket for 2018, according to exclusive Which? research. The budget retailer has knocked Waitrose from the top spot, which it held for three years. Sainsbury’s finished in last position, with the least-satisfied in-store customers overall. Asda, Morrisons and Tesco, the other three largest supermarkets, complete the bottom half of the rankings. The [...]...
  • Branded Sales Outpace Own Label For First Time Since 2014 as Irish Shoppers Show Their Loyal Side The latest grocery market share figures from Kantar Worldpanel in Ireland, for the 12 weeks ending 28 January 2018, show continued growth for Irish supermarkets with branded goods leading the way. David Berry, director at Kantar Worldpanel, comments: “The recovery of branded sales began in late 2017 and has continued apace in the new year. Sales [...]...

UK firm defends traditional freezing equipment

March 11
12:22 2013

UK firm Starfrost has defended traditional freezing methods against claims by cryogenic freezing proponents that they have greater environmental impact and are less efficient.

Neil Winney, managing director of the company, called the detrimental comparisons “outdated myths”.

In an article posted on Starfrost’s website, he said modern mechanical freezer systems can rival their cryogenic counterparts in terms of compact design, flexibility and freezing speed. They could also offer lower carbon emissions and greater flexibility, he said.

“Cryogenic exponents will often champion their cause by pronouncing a number of outdated myths in relation to today’s mechanical freezing systems,”  said Winney.

‘Constantly advanced’

“Whilst the principles of mechanical freezing have not changed since its invention over 100 years ago, components, materials and operating system technology have constantly advanced.”

In particular, he challenged assertions that more traditional freezing methods were slower than cryogenic freezing techniques.

“Modern day hi-tech mechanical IQF (Individual Quick Freezing) tunnels, especially high speed air impingement systems, are quite capable of extremely quick freezing of small, flat, unpackaged food products such as burgers, seafood and fish.

“Previously, only a cryogenic system would have been considered for very short freeze times.”

Cryogenic systems were also often considered to have a smaller footprint and be easier to install than their more traditional counterparts.

However, he said modern mechanical systems could now effectively compete with cryogenic freezers with spiral or tunnel designs built in compact modular format on mobile frames.

These mechanical systems cost much less to run and could deliver return on investment within 18 months, he said.

Although cryogenic freezers had low running costs in terms of energy consumption, the cost of the liquid gas necessary to operate them was high and variable, he added. And he said manufacturers needed to consider the carbon emissions inherent in the liquid gas production.

In addition, mechanical freezers could use natural, eco-friendly gases such as ammonia and electricity costs for running them could be fixed with energy providers, said Winney.

“Thanks to the latest industrial heat pump technology, waste heat from mechanical refrigeration systems can now be recovered, boosted and recycled. Food manufacturers can therefore save energy, reduce payback and enjoy massive long term financial benefits.”

About Author

colin

colin

Related Articles



Food & Drink Business Conference & Exhibition 2016

Upcoming Events

  • February 14, 2018BIOFACH
  • February 18, 2018Vinisud
  • February 25, 2018fish international
  • February 27, 2018Int'l Food Fair
AEC v1.0.4

find food jobs

The Magazine

F&D Business Preferred Suppliers

New Subscriber





Subscribe Here



Advertisements