FDBusiness.com

Eating too Much Salt Led to Nearly 2.3 Million Heart-related Deaths Worldwide

 Breaking News
  • Orkla Sells K-Salat to Stryhns Orkla Foods Danmark has agreed to sell its K-Salat business to Stryhns, which is part of the Norwegian Agra group. The purpose of the sale is to concentrate Orkla’s activities on fewer categories. K-Salat has a product portfolio of salad spreads, mayonnaise, remoulade, dressings and potato salads in Denmark. Under the agreement, Stryhns will take over [...]...
  • Ardgowan Secures £1 Million to Build Malt Whisky Distillery and Visitor Centre A project to build a new lowland Scotch malt whisky distillery and visitor centre in Inverclyde has taken major step forward with the award of nearly £1 million from the Scottish Government. The Ardgowan Distillery secured £982,000 from the government’s Food Processing, Marketing and Co-operation (FPMC) grant scheme – providing vital capital towards construction costs. Martin [...]...
  • Irish Craft Beer Sustaining Growth A new Bord Bia report has revealed that Irish craft beer is performing well across all fronts, from the number of production facilities to production output, market share and exports. The number of craft breweries in Ireland has grown by more than 500% in the last 5 years, with 72 now in operation, up from [...]...
  • Fi Europe Innovation Awards – The Shortlisted Companies One of the highlights at Fi Europe & Ni is the announcement of the winners of the Innovation Awards. The competition not only rewards the most innovative products and concepts, it also acts as a reliable trend barometer. The ten-member jury, chaired by Peter Wennström of The Healthy Marketing Team, presents a shortlist of the [...]...
  • Advetec Targets Food and Drink Manufacturers With Next Generation Organic Waste Digester To reduce food processors costs, Advetec, a leading specialist in the treatment and reduction of solid and liquid organic waste, has launched the Advetec XO, an evolution of the company’s successful Bio-Thermic Digester (BTD) technology. The system is designed to rapidly reduce organic content within waste at source,cutting off-site transportation and processing costs and helping food manufacturing companies [...]...

Eating too Much Salt Led to Nearly 2.3 Million Heart-related Deaths Worldwide

Eating too Much Salt Led to Nearly 2.3 Million Heart-related Deaths Worldwide
March 28
11:46 2013

Eating too much salt contributed to 2.3 million deaths from heart attacks, strokes and other heart-related diseases throughout the world in 2010, representing 15 percent of all deaths due to these causes, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention/Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism 2013 Scientific Sessions.

The researchers analyzed 247 surveys of adult sodium intake, stratified by age, gender, region and country between 1990 and 2010 as part of the 2010 Global Burden of Diseases Study, an international collaborative study by 488 scientists from 303 institutions in 50 countries around the world.

Next, they determined how the amount of sodium people were consuming was affecting their risk of cardiovascular disease, by performing a meta-analysis of 107 randomized, prospective trials that measured how sodium affects blood pressure, and a meta-analysis of how these differences in blood pressure relate to the risk of developing cardiovascular disease compared with consuming no more than 1,000 mg per day of sodium, which the researchers defined as an optimal amount of sodium for adults. Cardiovascular disease includes all diseases of the heart and blood vessels, including stroke.

Nearly 1 million of these deaths – 40 percent of the total — were premature, occurring in people 69 years of age and younger. Sixty percent of the deaths occurred in men and 40 percent were in women. Heart attacks caused 42 percent of the deaths and strokes 41 percent. The remainder resulted from other types of cardiovascular disease. Eighty-four percent of these deaths due to eating too much sodium were in low and middle-income countries, rather than high-income countries.

“National and global public health measures, such as comprehensive sodium reduction programs, could potentially save millions of lives,” says Dariush Mozaffarian, MD, Dr.P.H., lead author of the study and co-director of the Program in Cardiovascular Epidemiology and associate professor of medicine and epidemiology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School and the Harvard School of Public Health.

Among the 30 largest countries in the world, those with the highest death rates (per million adults) due to over consuming sodium were Ukraine, Russia and Egypt.

Among all countries, the three countries with the lowest death rates (per million adults) due to over consuming sodium were Qatar, Kenya and United Arab Emirates

The US ranked 19th out of the 30 largest countries, with 429 deaths per million adults due to eating too much sodium (representing 1 in 10 US deaths due to these causes).

The American Heart Association recommends limiting sodium in the diet to no more than 1,500 mg a day, and has tips on how to reduce the amount of sodium in the diet, as well as information on six commonly consumed foods that are high in sodium.

About Author

mike

mike

Related Articles



Food & Drink Business Conference & Exhibition 2016

Upcoming Events

  • November 28, 2017Fi Europe
  • December 4, 2017Plastics and Paper in Contact with Foodstuffs 2017
  • January 8, 2018RAI Exhibition
  • January 16, 2018Sival Plant Production Trade Show
AEC v1.0.4

find food jobs

The Magazine

F&D Business Preferred Suppliers

New Subscriber





Subscribe Here



Advertisements