FDBusiness.com

Reviving South Africa’s Love For Morogo

 Breaking News
  • Carlsberg Group Increases Ownership in Cambodian Business Carlsberg Group has increased its ownership in the Cambodian brewer Cambrew from 50% to 75%. Cambrew is among the largest brewers in Cambodia. Its largest beer brand – the iconic Angkor Premium Beer with its well-known tagline ‘Our Country, Our Beer’ – is a popular brand among Cambodian consumers. In addition, Cambrew produces and bottles [...]...
  • Kerry Group Reports Healthy Volume Growth Kerry Group, the global taste & nutrition and consumer foods group, has reported a solid underlying business performance for the half year ended 30 June 2018. Group revenue on a reported basis increased by 1.4% to €3.2 billion, reflecting strong volume growth and contribution from acquisitions, offset by adverse currency movements. Business volumes grew by [...]...
  • Glanbia and US Partners to Build $470 Million Cheese and Whey Factory Glanbia, the global nutrition group, along with US dairy co-operatives – Dairy Farmers of America and Select Milk Producers – expect to commission their new joint venture large-scale cheese and whey production facility for the State of Michigan in the fourth quarter of 2020 at a cost of $470 million. The new facility will process 3.6 [...]...
  • Ardagh Group Completes Conversion of Rugby Plant From Steel to Aluminium Ardagh Group has announced that it has recently completed the conversion of its Rugby (UK) beverage can manufacturing plant from steel to aluminium. “The conversion of the Rugby plant has further enhanced Ardagh’s manufacturing footprint. Operating two highly-efficient aluminium beverage can plants in the UK, at Wrexham and Rugby, supported by our recent investment in [...]...
  • New Production Line For Danish Crown to Serve Japanese Market Japanese consumers and restaurants have for decades had a strong preference for Danish pork, which is still growing. Danish Crown is consequently installing a new production line at its abattoir in Blans near Sønderborg, which will increase the number of employees from 1,100 to 1,200. Danish Crown’s exports to Japan amounted to more than DKr3 [...]...

Reviving South Africa’s Love For Morogo

Reviving South Africa’s Love For Morogo
December 02
12:38 2015

‘Morogo’ or ‘South African spinach’ refers to different varieties of green leafy vegetable that grow wild in South Africa, and a popular dish of the same name. Traditionally, these vegetables formed a much-loved part of the nation’s diet, but urbanisation and changing attitudes to food in the countryside have led to a decline in their popularity.

Much as Europeans have traditionally foraged for mushrooms, generations of South Africans have gathered morogo (which is high in protein, vitamins and minerals), to fry, boil or steam, and serve with onions or tomatoes.

In its new format, morogo is causing a stir on South African supermarket shelves. Until today it has never been farmed on a serious commercial scale, but now Nestlé is using morogo in the ‘tastemaker’ sachet used to flavour and fortify its Maggi noodles.

“Many packaged food brands claim to cater for local tastes, but Maggi with morogo genuinely does so. We’re offering people an authentic taste of South Africa and bringing a nutritious ingredient to urban dwellers, in particular, through a product that is quick and easy to prepare,” says Maarit Rein, a scientist working at Nestlé Research Center in Lausanne, Switzerland.

The new Nestlé noodles developed out of a partnership with South Africa’s Council for Scientific Investigation and Research (CSIR) and Agricultural Research Council (ARC) from 2012, to research plants growing there with clear health benefits, for potential use in foods to improve the nation’s diet.

Taste, nutritional quality and abundance were three things that the scientists were looking for in an ingredient. It had to be possible to process it for use in a food product, and it was vital that the ingredient provide farmers with an income source. Crucially, it also had to appeal to millions of South Africans.

NestleMaggiMorogoNestlé and its partners decided to research three species of morogo – amaranthus, cow pea and cleome – and worked closely with farmers to perfect their cultivation, and to refine the plants into a powder that preserved their nutritional benefits.

Getting a robot to eat its greens doesn’t seem the most obvious way to assess morogo’s nutritional potential, but this is exactly what the team did. Maarit Rein explains how they used an ‘artificial gut’ to compare the three varieties.

“An artificial gut is like a robot with a stomach and digestive tubes,” Maarit Rein says. “It allowed us to measure the quantities of different nutrients released from morogo during digestion, to assess their ‘bioavailability’ – their capacity to be absorbed into the bloodstream.”

Following this work the scientists chose amaranthus as the winning variety of morogo, due to its high levels of beta carotene, minerals and protein in particular.

About Author

mike

mike

Related Articles



Food & Drink Business Conference & Exhibition 2016

Upcoming Events

  • September 5, 2018Int'l Food Products and Processing Technologies Exhibition (WorldFood Istanbul)
  • September 12, 2018Packaging Innovations & Luxury Packaging London 2018
  • September 15, 2018iba
  • September 25, 2018PPMA Show 2018
AEC v1.0.4

find food jobs

The Magazine

F&D Business Preferred Suppliers

New Subscriber





Subscribe Here



Advertisements